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Microsoft word - sample learning outcomes -- humanities.doc

SAMPLE LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS IN THE HUMANITIES

The following pages contain examples of learning outcomes from other educational
institutions in the area of the humanities. These examples may be used as a point of
departure for developing learning outcomes for the majors in your department or
program.
Other educational institutions have posted links to learning outcomes assessment,
including Marquette University (http://www.marquette.edu/assessment/, with specific
learning outcomes at http://www.marquette.edu/assessment/outcomes/index.shtml); the
University of South Florida, with specific learning outcomes at
http://www.ie.usf.edu/OA/; and the University of Hawaii at Manoa
(http://manoa.hawaii.edu/assessment/, with specific learning outcomes at
http://manoa.hawaii.edu/assessment/update/view.php).
A compilation of other examples of learning outcomes is expected to be posted on a web
page on UCR’s Institutional Research for Undergraduate Education website
(http://irue.ucr.edu/) by the time of the Summit on Learning Outcomes and Assessment.
A link to this website will also be posted on the UCR WASC website
(http://wasc.ucr.edu).
The primary resource document regarding learning outcomes assessment is the
Assessment Guide from the University of Virginia
(http://www.web.virginia.edu/iaas/assessment/Assessment%20guide.pdf.).
Last year some workshops on learning assessment were held on campus through the
Scholarship of Teaching Seminar series. Video tapes of the following sessions are
available for review on the Scholarship of Teaching website
(http://www.teaching.ucr.edu/SoT.html):
(a) Strategies for establishing educational goals and evaluation procedures for all
undergraduate programs: The UC Berkeley Experience [Winter 2008] (b) Using ePortfolios for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment [Winter 2008] (c) Establishing Measures of Student Outcomes: A Debate on Methods [Fall 2007] Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 2 of 19 Learning Outcomes for majors in the Humanities, adapted from those developed at the University of Virginia are: Basic Outcomes (knowledge and comprehension)
• By the end of their second year in the program, African American Studies majors will, on a final exam, be able to summarize the history of the African Diaspora and the foundations for the Atlantic trade in African captives. • First-year Art History majors can identify, on a final exam, the title, artist, and • Second-year Art History majors can, during an essay test, comprehensively describe historical and contemporary approaches to the creation of art. • By the end of their second year, English majors can, on a final exam, describe and explain literary and cultural theories of English literature. • Philosophy majors will, on an essay exam, be able to choose and describe the • In a term paper, Philosophy majors will be able to gather and explain the history of philosophy, including both major themes and movements and some specific figures and systems. • Religious Studies majors will, on an essay exam, be able to discuss the value of open, free inquiry and religious diversity. • On a course examination, Ethnic Studies majors are able to comprehensively describe the history, function, and ongoing effects of racism in America. Higher-Order Outcomes (application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation)
• Art History majors will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the religious, political, moral, and cultural contexts in which works of art and architecture were made. • On a final exam, third-year Art History majors can gather and synthesize information about the religious, political, moral, and cultural contexts in which major works were created. • Prior to graduation, all fourth-year Art History majors can, as a final project, conduct art historical research, interpreting art work and integrating appropriate secondary sources. • During a final exam, first year Religious Studies majors can interpret similarities and differences of specific religious traditions. • Fourth year English majors will, with a final project, analyze the history, genres, and important works in English literature. • Philosophy majors will, on an essay exam, be able to analyze philosophical texts. Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 3 of 19 • By writing a term paper, majors in humanities fields will examine issues with a mind open to a variety of reasonable positions and will subject their own views to rational criticism. • By writing a final exam essay, all English majors will demonstrate the ability to formulate an effective literary argument. • On a term paper, Philosophy majors will be able to compose valid philosophical • During a final exam, Philosophy majors will be able to distinguish between valid • Religious Studies majors will, on an exit exam, be able to compare and contrast interpretive theories of religious studies. • On a final exam, graduating Women’s Studies majors will be able to apply feminist theory to contemporary social problems, using the work of major figures in the field.
Sample Learning Outcomes for Specific UCR Humanities Undergraduate Majors:

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
The following are the learning outcomes for Africana Studies at the University of South
Florida:
1. Graduating seniors will demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of the history and culture of people of African descent in the Diaspora, and the major schools of thought in Africana Studies. 2. Graduating seniors will be required to demonstrate ability to present an argument verbally that displays their knowledge and understanding of the diverse history, cultural linkages, and social geography of people of African heritage in Africa and the Diaspora. 3. For the final year of preparation for the BA degree, students will be required to maintain a portfolio of class projects that demonstrate an understanding of the link between African cultural institutions and those of the people of African descent in the Diaspora.
See also, on page 2 of this document, the example of a learning outcome in African
American Studies at the University of Virginia.

ART HISTORY

Learning outcomes for majors in the History of Art at the University of Michigan include
the following:
1. Content-based: Undergraduates will expand their knowledge of history of art by: Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 4 of 19 · identifying major monuments, paintings, and sculptures---those regarded as important by subsequent artists in the traditions in question; · understanding how the appearance and content of particular works are related to and the result of the sociocultural issues of the time and place in which they were created; · exploring the various ways art is situated in society and culture; its production and reception; the interaction of text and image; · studying art by theme, genre, or by issue, e.g. landscape, word/image, · comparing artifacts with bodies of historical data and across cultures so as to assess the relevance of one for the others as well as identify general questions related to cultural production. abilities in history of art by: · developing the vocabulary to articulate the complexity of visual analysis in · reading critically both primary and secondary sources; · finding, assessing, and using essential research sources, secondary materials, and primary sources (often in languages other than English); · making oral presentations using multi-media hardware/software; · formulating own questions, comparing different premises, positions, and original interpretation of a problem supported by visual evidence.
For further discussion of learning outcomes in the History of Art at the University of
Michigan, please see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 15,
47-48. Note, however, that the assessment measures were developed almost 10 years ago
and do not meet today’s requirements for assessment measures.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in the Art History at the University of
Alabama, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=150&yr=2007&dg=13418&prg=10#tes
t
ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Asian
American Studies have not been located; please see examples from related majors for
general guidance.
ASIAN LITERATURES AND CULTURES
Learning outcomes for majors in East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of
Illinois are as follows:
Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities
Page 5 of 19
Outcome 1: A firm competence in an East Asian language—ability to communicate
effectively in the language of the target country in a linguistically and culturally appropriate manner. Outcome 2: A solid familiarity with East Asian cultures through multiple disciplines.
Outcome 3: A more advanced knowledge of the region including research and writing

For more information on learning outcomes assessment in East Asian Languages and
Cultures at the University of Illinois, including discussion of assessment measures, see
http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/EALC08.pdf
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Asian Languages and Cultures at the
University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 22-
23.

ASIAN STUDIES

Learning outcomes for majors in East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of
Illinois are as follows:
Outcome 1: A firm competence in an East Asian language—ability to communicate
effectively in the language of the target country in a linguistically and culturally appropriate manner. Outcome 2: A solid familiarity with East Asian cultures through multiple disciplines.
Outcome 3: A more advanced knowledge of the region including research and writing

For more information on learning outcomes assessment in East Asian Languages and
Cultures at the University of Illinois, including discussion of assessment measures, see
http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/EALC08.pdf
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Asian Languages and Cultures at the
University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 22-
23.

CHICANO STUDIES

Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Chicano
Studies have not been located; please see examples from related majors for general
guidance.
CLASSICAL STUDIES
Learning outcomes for majors in Classics at the University of Alabama are as follows:
Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 6 of 19 1. All Classics majors will attain a basic competency in Greek and Latin. 2. Majors concentrating in Greek will attain fluency in reading and translating classical Greek, familiarity with epic, archaic, and Attic Greek, and acquaintance with post-classical and Hellenistic Greek. 3. Majors concentrating in Latin will attain fluency in reading and translating classical Latin, familiarity with Republican, Augustan, and Imperial Latin, and acquaintance with archaic and late Latin. 4. Classics majors will become familiar with a variety of different classical literary genres, including epic, lyric, dramatic, and epigrammatic poetry, and oratorical, satirical, philosophical, and historical prose. They will also acquire a working knowledge of classical meter, rhetoric, literary convention, and religion. 5. Classics majors will acquire familiarity with all aspects of the ancient world, including Greek and Roman history, and the Greeks and Romans themselves as the beginning of Western Civilization and the foundation of the modern West. 6. Students will obtain the breadth and depth of knowledge that will make them attractive to graduate programs and employers.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Classics at the University of
Alabama, including assessment methods, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=90&yr=2007&dg=39&prg=38#test
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in the Department of Classical Studies at
the University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 30-
31; for discussion of learning outcomes assessment in the Department of Classics at the
University of Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/classics08.pdf.
COMPARATIVE ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS STUDIES
See discussion under Classical Studies, immediately above.
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
Learning outcomes for majors in Comparative and World Literature at the University of
Illinois are as follows:
* comparative understanding of national literatures in the context of a globalizing * ability to situate texts in their cultural and historical contexts * appreciation for the aesthetic qualities of literary texts * awareness of influential critical and interpretive methods * general understanding of the conventions of literary genres and of the major * general understanding of the historical developments of at least two literatures * acquisition of analytical and critical thinking skills Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 7 of 19 * ability to express oneself orally and in writing in a clear, coherent and persuasive * ability to construct interpretive arguments * ability to participate in 200-and 300-level literature and culture courses in at least
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Comparative and World Literature at
the University of Illinois, including discussion of assessment measures, see
http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/comparative_and_world_literature08.pdf
See http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf,
pp. 33-34 for a discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Comparative Literature at
the University of Michigan.
CREATIVE WRITING
Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Creative
Writing have not been located; please see examples from related majors for general
guidance.
ENGLISH
Program outcome/objective in the English Department, King’s College, includes the following: 1. Students in our writing program will be able to write informational, reportorial, critical, research, and autobiographical papers that meet the standards of the English Department faculty. For assessment methods/measures for the King’s College program and the corresponding results/action plan, see the Appendix to the University of Virginia Assessment Guide: http://www.web.virginia.edu/iaas/assessment/Assessment%20guide.pdf. Learning outcomes for majors in English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan are: 1. A broad understanding of literatures written in English, especially the British and American traditions, including representative authors, major literary periods, and the history of the language 2. An appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of works of literature, including knowledge of literary forms and genres and the ability to recognize and to produce good writing 3. The ability to relate individual texts to their historical and cultural contexts 4. Knowledge of critical approaches and methods of interpretation, including literary 5. Advanced skills in oral and written communication, including the ability to use principles of composition, style, rhetoric, and bibliographic reference Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities
Page 8 of 19
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in English Language and
Literature at the University of Michigan, including discussion of assessment measures,
see http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp.
36-37.
For discussion of learning outcomes and assessment in English at the University of
Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/english08.pdf; for discussion of
learning outcomes and assessment at in English at the University of Alabama, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=57&yr=2007&dg=30&prg=21#test.
See, also, the additional examples of learning outcomes at the top of this document.
ETHNIC STUDIES

Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Ethnic
Studies have not been located, other than the one learning outcome identified from the
University of Virginia in the general section above. Please see examples from related
majors for additional general guidance.
FRENCH

The following are learning outcomes for French majors at the University of Illinois:
Acquire proficiency in speaking, writing, and understanding French; acquire general
knowledge about French and Francophone culture; acquire general knowledge about the
structure and history of the French language; develop essay-writing skills; gain
competence in specific literary genres and periods; gain experience studying in a French-
speaking country; draw conclusions after weighing evidence; locate and use information;
understand cultural differences; learn analytical, interpretive, and problem-solving skills;
work cooperatively in groups.
Program specific, in addition to the above:
Concentration in French Studies: learn methods of literary and cultural analysis.
Concentration in French Commercial Studies: acquire competence in French business
language and concepts as well as translation skills.
Curriculum preparatory to the teaching of French: earn state teacher certification; learn
theoretical, philosophical, and psychological bases of language acquisition and teaching.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in French at the University of
Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/french08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes in Romance Languages and Literatures at the
University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, p. 64;
Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities
Page 9 of 19
for discussion of learning outcomes in French at the University of Alabama, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=90&yr=2007&dg=39&prg=34#test.
GERMANIC STUDIES

Learning outcomes for Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois
are:
A. Language ability: Students develop and improve their language abilities, i.e., their
ability to read, speak, write, and listen in English, German, and a modern Scandinavian language. In addition to these four modalities, students also develop and improve their ability to work with texts in a different language/from a different culture. B. Cultural literacy: Students develop and improve their ability to function in a non- native cultural and linguistic context as well as an ability to work with texts in a different language/from a different culture. Students can recognize cultural differences and similarities and embrace them. That is, students develop cultural competence in a globalized world. C. Analytical and argumentative skills: Students develop and improve their abilities to analyze texts representing different genres and develop and improve their abilities in argumentation. Students hone their critical thinking and discursive skills (the real domains of the humanities) by distinguishing between opinions, facts, analysis, and argument. D. Factual Knowledge: Students are introduced to the different fields within German and/or Scandinavian studies. They are familiar with the key writers, texts, and figures and their historical contexts as well as with the linguistic realities within the target cultures. E. Writing development: Students are able to produce well-written academic texts in German, Swedish, and English. In their writing, they display an awareness of audience and an understanding of how textual choices reflect coherent argumentation. Students know how to conduct research and understand the value of multiple draft-writing.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Germanic Languages and
Literatures at the University of Illinois, see
http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/germanic_languages_and_literature08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Germanic Languages and Literatures
at the University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 13-
15, 44-45; for discussion of learning outcomes assessment in German at the University of
Alabama, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=90&yr=2007&dg=39&prg=32#test.
GLOBAL STUDIES

Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities
Page 10 of 19
Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Global
Studies have not been located; please see examples from related majors for general
guidance.
HISTORY

Learning outcomes for History majors at the University of Illinois are as follows:
Outcome 1: Acquiring historical knowledge; replacing students' misunderstanding of
history as a discipline in which experts assemble uncontested facts into an objective
story. Suggesting instead the diverse methods of research and means of interpretation that
historians invoke.
Outcome 2: Improving students' ability to write and speak clearly and effectively;
empowering them to criticize, explore, and develop their own perspectives and
interpretations, and to research and support their own logical arguments.
Outcome 3: Discriminating between a primary and a secondary source and their uses in
research.
Outcome 4: Obtaining tools to decode, contextualize, interrogate, and derive meaning
from primary sources; recognize the variety of primary sources, and the importance of
better drawing inferences by locating them in historical context (how, when, and for
whom they were produced; human agency behind their production).
Outcome 5: Learning how to identify and assess central arguments, themes, perspectives,
and theoretical frameworks of secondary sources.
Outcome 6: Appreciating the complexity of historical causation.
Outcome 7: Learning to think historically and to carry out historical research: planning
and carrying out a historical research project; formulating historical questions and
arguments, while locating and deploying historical data to answer or support them;
comparing, contrasting, and exploring relationships among multiple primary and
secondary sources; improving ability to comprehend historical narratives; improving
ability to think analytically and logically while applying historical perspectives.
Outcome 8: Grasping both the foreignness of the past and the ways that the past shapes
and gives meaning to their own lives and to society at large.
Outcome 9: Broadening a capacity for empathy through an appreciation of shared
humanity and the diversity of the human experience, as influenced by culture, race,
ethnicity, gender, and class in a matrix of time and place.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in History at the University of
Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/histug08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in History at the University of Alabama,
see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=66&yr=2007&dg=33&prg=171#test.
HASS INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 11 of 19 The following are learning outcomes for Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of Alabama: 1. To have formed, completed and defended an integrated depth study of inter- or 2. To be able to do high level problem solving utilizing a diversity of critical thinking skills and research methodologies. 3. To be skilled in ethical reflection towards life-long learning and civic
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Interdisciplinary Studies at the
University of Alabama, including discussion of learning outcomes assessment in the
college in which Interdisciplinary Studies is located (New College), see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=93&yr=2007&dg=42&prg=39#test.
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
The following are learning outcomes for Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of
Alabama:
1. To have formed, completed and defended an integrated depth study of inter- or 2. To be able to do high level problem solving utilizing a diversity of critical thinking skills and research methodologies. 3. To be skilled in ethical reflection towards life-long learning and civic
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Interdisciplinary Studies at the
University of Alabama, including discussion of learning outcomes assessment in the
college in which Interdisciplinary Studies is located (New College), see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=93&yr=2007&dg=42&prg=39#test.
LANGUAGE
Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in Languages have not
been located; please see examples from related majors for general guidance.
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Latin
American Studies have not been located; please see examples from related majors for
general guidance.
LAW AND SOCIETY
Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities
Page 12 of 19
Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Law and
Society have not been located; please see examples from related majors for general
guidance.
LIBERAL STUDIES
The following are learning outcomes for Elementary Education at the University of
Alabama:
1. Have in-depth knowledge of core subject matter and pedagogical strategies appropriate for teaching elementary children as described in professional standards. 2. Demonstrate skills and understanding of pedagogical and content knowledge that meet the standards of the profession at the local, state and national levels. 3. Display a thorough understanding of knowledge, skills, and dispositions of a professional teaching in school environments as described in state and national standards. 4. Collaboratively interact with faculty and supervisors within partnership schools to improve and refine the knowledge and abilities required to meet and exceed institutional, state, and national performance standards and competencies. For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Elementary Education at the University of Alabama, see http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=2&dpt=52&yr=2007&dg=95&prg=91#test. The following are learning outcomes for Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of Alabama: 1. To have formed, completed and defended an integrated depth study of inter- or 2. To be able to do high level problem solving utilizing a diversity of critical thinking skills and research methodologies. 3. To be skilled in ethical reflection towards life-long learning and civic
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Interdisciplinary Studies at the
University of Alabama, including discussion of learning outcomes assessment in the
college in which Interdisciplinary Studies is located (New College), see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=93&yr=2007&dg=42&prg=39#test.
LINGUISTICS
Learning outcomes in Linguistics at the University of Michigan are as follows:
1. Provide students with training in the analytic tools, formal procedures, argumentation, and critical thinking used in linguistic investigation. Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 13 of 19 2. Provide non-concentrators with general knowledge of the nature and structure of human language, including its diversity, that might prove to be valuable in a liberal arts and sciences education, and as a part of a more general education for citizenship. 3. Provide concentrators with in-depth knowledge of three central areas of the field. · Within sound structure: knowledge of key properties of sounds as physical (phonetic) entities and linguistic (phonological) units. · Within syntactic structure: knowledge of the fundamental aspects of transformational generative analyses of natural human language. · Within semantics: knowledge of key aspects of semantic and pragmatic systems in natural language, including logic and formal systems, reference / co-reference, and text analysis. 4. Provide concentrators with opportunities outside of the classroom for applying and enhancing their knowledge of the field, including an undergraduate linguistics association, colloquia and workshops, and experiential practice. 5. Encourage concentrators to explore the importance of language in a variety of areas of human life by offering a broad range of courses and guiding students in selecting an appropriate concentration program. graduate study in linguistics or related disciplines, and to provide concentrators who emphasize applied linguistics in their coursework with background relevant to teaching English as a Second Language, especially in an international setting.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Linguistics at the University of
Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 51-
52.
MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES
Learning outcomes for Media Studies majors at the University of Illinois are as follows:
1. The ideal graduate will have an understanding of various forms of media / communication technology across cultural and historical contexts. 2. The ideal graduate will have an appreciation of a broad liberal arts framework for critical thinking about contemporary media / communication technology developments. 3. The ideal graduate will have the ability to identify and articulate the key issues (social, cultural, economic, ethical and political) raised by the global information order. 4. The ideal graduate will be able to write clearly and persuasively for a variety of 5. The ideal graduate will have a commitment to academic work or professional work that is gender inclusive, culturally diverse and international in scope. 6. The ideal graduate will have successfully completed independent research and / or Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 14 of 19 7. The ideal graduate interested in pursuing graduate education, will be prepared for first-class programs in such fields as the media, law, political science, sociology, and public policy issues.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Media Studies at the
University of Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/media_studies08.pdf.
NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

Specific examples of learning outcomes from other universities in the area of Native
American Studies have not been located; please see examples from related majors for
general guidance.
PHILOSOPHY
Learning outcomes for Philosophy majors at the University of Illinois are as follows:
Ability to comprehend complex material.
• Ability to critically evaluate reasoning and arguments.
• Ability to recognize assumptions underlying claims.
• Ability to note relevant consequences of stated principles or hypotheses.
• Ability to suggest alternative hypotheses to those presented.
• Familiarity with major historical schools of thought in philosophy.
• Familiarity with central epistemological and metaphysical views.
• Familiarity with influential competing ethical theories.
• Familiarity with current developments in professional philosophy.
• Ability to write critically about complex matters.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Philosophy at the University of
Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/philosophy08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Philosophy at the University of
Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 57-
58; for discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Philosophy at the University of
Alabama, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=100&yr=2007&dg=22&prg=177#test.
See, also, the additional examples of learning outcomes at the top of this document.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Learning outcomes for majors in Religion at the University of Illinois are as follows:
We expect all of our majors to learn about the history, concepts, beliefs, practices, and so
on of major religious traditions such as Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Daoism,
Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities
Page 15 of 19
Hinduism, Judaism (and the religion of the ancient Hebrews), Islam, and Shinto. They are
expected to understand how such global religious traditions as these reflect the social
contexts in which they emerged, and in turn how the traditions affect and transform those
societies. We expect our majors to acquire and to deploy the methods of history,
linguistics, philosophy and other humanistic and social science disciplines during their
studies, and to learn the languages that are needed for a full grasp of their area of
specialization. We also expect our majors to learn how to think and write with
sophistication, intelligence, and insight. We expect them to be able to interpret, and
analyze difficult texts, including seminal texts in their fields. We expect them to be able
to articulate and to defend, with clarity and with insight, a point of view or thesis on
matters of significance or controversy in their field of study, and to acquire the
vocabulary and intellectual skills to do so. In addition we expect our students to develop
an attitude of curiosity and an attitude of appreciation for the traditions and cultures of
others.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Religion at the University of
Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/religious_studies08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Religious Studies at the University of
Alabama, see
http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=106&yr=2007&dg=52&prg=181#test.
See, also, the additional examples of learning outcomes at the top of this document.
RUSSIAN STUDIES
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois has
developed explicit, if extensive, learning outcomes for each year of the program, with in
the subdivisions of language courses, linguistics courses, and literature courses:
SUB-DIVISION 1: LANGUAGE COURSES The Department's undergraduate language courses are meant to provide students with a command of the languages taught -- 1. For students taking the Russian 1st year (101-102) sequence: • read and write Russian letters and words and sentences • give and respond with simple greetings • introduce yourself and make introductions to others • discuss activities in which you regularly participate • discuss professions and academic topics, including subjects and languages • ask for and give simple directions • describe your living accommodations and hometown • purchase needed materials • describe personal appearances and possessions • express likes and dislikes Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 16 of 19 • use numbers from 1-99 • use the past and future tenses • use time expressions • express motion • use days of the week and months of the year • go shopping • agree and disagree • make comparisons 2. For students taking the Russian 2d year (201-202) sequence: • discuss holiday plans, including making toasts • more exact time expressions • tell the temperature and discuss the weather • survive a trip to the doctor's • Russian food and traditions • the arts in Russia • Russian proverbs • read several short stories and poems watch and understand two detective movies be able to write short essays about yourself be able to write brief creative works be able to guess and hypothesize in writing and in speech Students completing the Russian 101-202 sequences are expected to test at the 3. For students taking Russian Language courses at the 3d year (300-level): The Department offers Russian 301-302, which is Russian language at the 3d-year level, involving advanced grammar, composition, and conversation. These courses are taught in Russian and use authentic Russian materials. At the end of the 300-language series, students will have an increased knowledge of Russian grammar, the ability to read advanced authentic Russian texts, the ability to converse on more complicated topics (with the added ACTFL advanced level abilities to describe, narrate, and compare), and to write essays demonstrating these same advanced-level abilities. Students completing the Russian 300-level language courses are expected to test at the ACTFL Intermediate-High level, although some students who have spent time in Russia will test at the Advanced level. 4. For students taking Russian 401-402 (4th year): Students are expected to increase their knowledge of and ability to work with authentic Russian audio and written texts on the ACTFL advanced level from that gained in the 300-level courses. Students completing Russian 401-402 are expected to test at the ACTFL Advanced level. 5. For students taking the Czech 2-year, Polish 2-year, the Serbian/ Croatian 2-year, and the Ukrainian 2-year sequences: The goals for each level are similar to those for Russian 2-year (101-202) sequences cited above; the only differences appear in the order in which topics are presented. Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 17 of 19 Undergraduate students taking those of our linguistics courses that are designed for both undergraduate and graduate students, such as Russ 408 (Russ Pronunciation and Phonetics) are expected to add to their level of language competence in the specific sectors indicated by the course titles. SUB-DIVISION 3: LITERATURE COURSES. The Russian Literature courses at the 100-400 level are meant to provide undergraduate students with: • a knowledge of the works in the canon of Russian literature; • an understanding of the special role that Russian writers and poets have historically played in Russian society and history; a command of analytical techniques and approaches relevant for the study of Russian prose and poetry.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Slavic Languages and
Literatures at the University of Illinois see
http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/slavic_languages_and_literature08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Slavic Languages and Literatures at
the University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, pp. 65-
66.
SPANISH
Learning outcomes for majors in Spanish at the University of Illinois are as follows:
1. In terms of Spanish language proficiency, students should be able to
* understand someone else speaking about a discipline-related topic and be able * speak with few errors in grammar and pronunciation about topics related to their particular area of study and to develop and articulate positions in Spanish; * produce clearly organized and coherent written texts in Spanish on topics related to their discipline within Hispanic studies; * use appropriate sociolinguistic registers in written and oral modalities; * write with minimal errors in grammar, spelling and the mechanics of writing
2. In terms of cultural competency, students should be able to
* demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives and products of the culture * acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the study of a foreign language and texts produced in different cultural contexts; Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 18 of 19 * recognize different patterns of interaction that are relevant in different cultural * reflect on their own cultural frame of reference and their own cultural
3. In terms of content, students should
* possess broad knowledge of the disciplines that comprise contemporary Hispanic studies (cultural, historical, literary and linguistic studies); and if the student chooses to specialize, possess fundamental knowledge of one or more disciplines within Hispanic studies; * possess knowledge of the three basic populations represented by Hispanic studies (Spain, U.S. Latino/a, and Latin America) as well as of their languages, cultures, and literary production; * possess basic knowledge of the structure, form and variation of the Spanish * establish comparisons and connections between the material studied and similar materials available to the monolingual English speaker.
4. In terms of critical and analytical competencies, students should be able to
* use critical thinking skills when approaching texts and other cultural manifestations (visual arts, movies, music, etc.); * sustain thoughtful evaluative judgments and analysis of literary and non- * critically assess and evaluate competing ideas and experiences; * recognize, understand, and evaluate normative value issues.
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Spanish at the University of
Illinois, see
http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/spanish_italian_and_portuguese08.pdf.
For discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Romance Languages and Literatures
at the University of Michigan, see
http://www.provost.umich.edu/reports/slfstudy/ir/pdfs/assess/lsa_full_version.pdf, p. 64;
for discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Spanish at the University of Alabama,
see http://uaops.ua.edu/right_arm_x.cfm?col=3&dpt=90&yr=2007&dg=39&prg=35#test.
WOMEN’S STUDIES

The following are learning outcomes for Gender and Women’s Studies majors at the
University of Illinois:
Students will:
Outcome 1. Understand how racial, ethnic, religious, class, and other social categories
intersect with gender and shape understandings of what it means to be female, male, transgender, and/or intersexed. Sample Learning Outcomes – Humanities Page 19 of 19 • Outcome 2. Be familiar with women’s and men’s roles in families, cultures, social
institutions, politics, economics, history, and global contexts. • Outcome 3. Recognize the impact of culture, politics, and social structure on women’s
and men’s psychology, behavior, and styles of communication. • Outcome 4. Understand how political, economic, and ethical policy issues arise from
Outcome 5. Know and be able to compare new methods of research and theories of
knowledge that have informed the study of gender and sexuality. • Outcome 6. Develop the critical thinking skills needed to assess, critique, and construct
arguments based on theoretical justification and empirical data. • Outcome 7. Develop communication skills (written and verbal) in order to persuasively
construct arguments, summaries, and analyses of material with which they interact; and to articulate their ideas and understanding of material to one another in class presentations and discussion. • Outcome 8. Develop reading skills to enhance their ability to analyze a variety of texts,
including written, visual, cultural, and political forms of representation. • Outcome 9. Develop their intellectual commitment to improve their skills and talents in
Outcome 10. Develop their ethical commitment to apply what they have learned and
understand the importance of civic engagement. • Outcome 11. Develop advocacy skills in order to understand the ways in which gender,
race, class, sexuality, and disability structure individual, community, representational, and institutional practices; and the willingness to intervene in bias in each of those venues. • Outcome 12. Achieve an understanding of the practices of academic disciplines and the
For further discussion of learning outcomes assessment in Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, see http://www.cte.uiuc.edu/assessment/plans/gender_and_womens_studies08.pdf. See, also, the additional examples of learning outcomes at the top of this document.

Source: http://wasc.ucr.edu/docs/Sample%20Learning%20Outcomes%20--%20Humanities.pdf

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