112

Course Title
Lecturer
Semester
Course Objectives
Medical and Pharmaceutical Chemistry (how drugs are made and used) Acquire basic knowledge of pharmaceutical products, such as drug design and how they are developed. In addition, students will deepen their understanding of the use of drugs through learning Course Outline
Pharmaceutical products are defined as substances that are aimed at diagnosing, treating or preventing diseases in humans or animals. It is no exaggeration to say that the history of pharmaceutical products is the history of a battle against foreign microbes (e.g. bacteria, collectively called pathogens). Although the discovery of antibiotics appeared to have put an end to the battle, many problems remain unsolved, including the emergence of new drug-resistant bacteria or viruses and many others. Endogenous diseases have also increased in recent years. In particular, the increase in so-called adult diseases such as diabetes as well as many types of cancer and immunological diseases will continue to place greater importance on pharmaceutical products and call for the development of new pharmaceutical products against specific pathological conditions. However, pharmaceutical products are a supplementary means, and full recovery from a disease is reliant on the homeostatic functions of life and the immune system. For the development of pharmaceutical products to help sustain these functions of life, knowledge of many of the functions of This course is based on basic organic chemistry and provides an overview of the methods of developing pharmaceutical products, how they are developed, today’s pharmaceutical system and other topics. At the same time, we discuss biological polymers and other substances, and their roles and relationships with diseases will be explained. An understanding of today’s pharmaceutical products requires knowledge of their historical background. The lecturer will pick up and explain topics from the world of drugs that originate from crude drugs. Some much-talked-about pharmaceutical products (antiviral drugs and Tamiflu, for example) and some diseases currently in question (hay fever and cancer, for example) will also be discussed. This will help deepen students’ understanding of pharmaceutical products. Course Schedule
1 Guidance: What Are Organic Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Products? 3 History of Pharmaceutical Products, Crude Drugs and Synthetic Pharmaceutical Products 4 History f Pharmaceutical Products, Crude Drugs and Synthetic Pharmaceutical Products 5 Pharmaceutical Products and Stereochemistry: The Healthcare System in Japan 6 Pharmaceutical Products and Stereochemistry: The Healthcare System in Japan 7 Methods of Exploration of Pharmaceutical Products: Hay Fever and Adult Diseases 8 Methods of Exploration of Pharmaceutical Products: Hay Fever and Adult Diseases 11 Methods of Development of New Drugs: Food and Pharmaceutical Products 12 Methods of Development of New Drugs: Food and Pharmaceutical Products 13 Pharmaceutical Products and Life Science In The Future 14 Pharmaceutical Products and Life Science In The Future Evaluation
Today, people can go to a hospital and have many kinds of drugs prescribed. They can also purchase them with ease at large drugstores and the like. The grading of students will be based on whether they understand not only drugs but also the defensive mechanism of a living body and other pieces of important knowledge for the effective utilization of the easy availability of the drugs. Specifically, an assignment will be given at the end of the course, and students are required to submit a report for

Source: http://web.iec.aoyama.ac.jp/english/course/2010pdf_s/112_medical_and_pharmaceutical_chemistry_2010.pdf

Mk-801 improves retention in aged rats: implications for altered neural plasticity in age-related memory deficits

Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 71, 194 –206 (1999) Article ID nlme.1998.3864, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on Implications for Altered Neural Plasticity Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Alterations in N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plas-ticity, characteristic of aged rodents, may contribute to im

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The Essential Facilities Doctrine – What Was Wrong inMicrosoft?**The essential facilities doctrine is designed to oblige dominant undertakingsto make available their important facilities, including intellectual propertyrights, for other undertakings. It requires a delicate balance of, on the onehand, protecting the exclusivity of ownership and on the other hand en-couraging other undertakings

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